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The Disposable Employee

Quitting Economy

I happened upon this article in an excellent, philosophy-oriented news magazine, Aeon. It looks like employees have finally become the same products as widgets on an assembly line. No job security, no employer loyalty, nor even an expectation of one. You take a job, not for the economic security or benefits, but to prepare yourself for the next one. It’s chilling and may be another reason behind the  increase in the freelance workforce. Welcome to the world of neoliberal capitalism in the US and the domination of markets over people. How does it feel to be disposable?

The quitting economy: When employees are treated as short-term assets, they reinvent themselves as marketable goods, always ready to quit

“But as market value overtook other measures of a company’s value, maximising the short-term interests of shareholders began to override other concerns, other relationships. Quarterly earnings reports and stock prices became even more important, the sole measures of success. How companies treated employees changed, and has not changed back.”

Read the rest of this article. (If you’re an employee in this type of situation, or already a freelancer, don’t expect to enjoy it.)

All Those Hours Working? Not so Good.

post-it-note-man

Work-life balance and allotting time for oneself are becoming increasingly common themes in the articles and feeds I typically read as part of my daily research routine. Here’s what science has to say about working more than 40 hours in one week, at least according to Inc. Magazine. Here’s my take-away from this article: “Don’t work more than 50 hours if you value your health, happiness, and connections to others.”

We’ll be talking about work-life balance and productivity in upcoming podcast episodes this July. In the meantime, read the full article below. It’s interesting and relevant to the freelance life:

Science Says You Shouldn’t Work More Than This Number of Hours a Week

Working too much can be counterproductive and even hazardous to your health. You’ve been warned.

Do you work more than 40 hours a week? If you’re an entrepreneur or small business owner, it’s hard not to, but all that extra time in the workplace isn’t necessarily a good thing. After a certain point, it can be counterproductive and even hazardous to your health, so it’s imperative to know when to say no to more hours.

Read the rest of the article here.