Is the Future of Work Stuck in the Past?

Here’s an interesting and thoughtful piece from the National Freelancers Union. More people are talking about the new, freelance workforce (also known as the “gig economy”), but rarely from the point of view of those freelance workers themselves. Read on to get the union’s take on this tendency, particularly in academia:

Is the Future of Work Stuck in the Past?

This article is reproduced with the permission of the Freelancers Union partner, Trupo.

antique carAlmost 25 years ago, Freelancers Union was formed to cater to the needs of a growing independent workforce – one that didn’t have a mechanism to help everyone come together, pool resources, and advocate for their rights.

Now, roughly 56.7 million – one in three – Americans reported freelancing last year, contributing $1 trillion to the economy. Naturally, the rise of the gig economy, coworking spaces, and terms like “permalance” spark discussions and panels around the future of work.

Unfortunately, more often than not, Future of Work conversations focus on the impact on businesses rather than individual workers. Over a nice catered lunch, attendees are given advice on how businesses should market to the new workforce as consumers, and most recently, how technology and automation will affect business profitability and the labor force.

Notably absent from the talks are the middle-class workers directly shaping the future. These events happen at think tanks and academic institutions, fueled by an influx of philanthropic funding. Yes, they can lead to some interesting solutions for potential challenges the workforce could face, but they’re not coming from the people who are most affected by the changing work structure and economy. In fact, “The Future of Work” takeaways are often radically disconnected from the needs of American workers.

Read the rest of this article on the Freelancers Union blog.

 

The Freelancers Guide to 2019 Taxes

It’s that time of year again. TIme to collect all those slips of paper and call the accountant, or prepare your 2018 taxes on your own. The Freelancers Union has a few helpful tips for handling this paperwork-heavy task. Read on and sharpen those pencils!

The Freelancers Union 2019 tax guide

We’ve put together everything freelancers need to know about 2019 taxes, from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’s (tax reform) impact on deductions, and key filing dates, to how to handle W-2s and supplemental income.

With less than six weeks to go until the Monday, April 15 filing deadline, 2019 tax season is well and truly upon us. And while taxes are anxiety-inducing at the best of times, this is no ordinary year.

The major piece of tax reform legislation known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) goes into effect this year, and will have significant effects on individuals, businesses, and tax exempt entities. As freelancers operate across all sectors of the workforce, it is therefore crucial to familiarize yourself with these changes, as well as fundamental best filing practices.

Read this article.

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