Arlington Entrepreneurs

Tag archives for Freelancers Union

Working for Free as a Newbie: Is it Ever Worth it?

Share

A lot of new businesses end up providing their products or services free of charge, as a way of gaining name recognition and potential paying business down the road. But, is this opportunity or exploitation? As Naya of the National Freelancers Union points out, “you can’t pay your bills with exposure and experience.”

Is there a way to take the upper hand in such a situation, and negotiate from a position of strength rather than weakness? Take a look at Naya’s article, which has some interesting and useful suggestions for getting more than “exposure” out of a free gig.

 

Working for Free as a Newbie: Is it Ever Worth it?
by Naya the Creative of the National Freelancers Union

You’ve been designing/painting/consulting/writing code/underwater basket weaving for years. Maybe you’re self-taught or maybe you’ve taken some classes. Either way, you have skills. And, if you do say so yourself, you’ve gotten pretty damn good at what you’re doing. But, since you’ve never charged actual money, and you have no idea how to get clients for a new business, you’re feeling a little insecure.

You don’t have a portfolio, or case studies, or past clients to show for your skillset. And even though all of your friends keep telling you, like, every day, to go out on your own and start a business, none of them have any experience in how to get clients. And yeah, while you’re glad that they’re so supportive of you, you don’t actually know what to do now. #Pressure

Because, even though you’re really talented, you don’t know how to get clients for a new business when you’ve never had clients.

Read the rest of this article.

You Are Not A Bank

Share

From the Freelancers Union blog, a great article about managing your payment terms.

Net-30 is the Voldemort of Freelance Payment Terms

by Matt Fulton

Hi. Can I borrow $5,000 to pay for your design/accounting/consulting/freelance services? I’ll pay you back in a month or two, after you’ve completed the work.

No? I didn’t think so.

Yet this is effectively what we are doing when offering clients net-30 payment terms. The only difference is that, instead of giving the client cash like with a traditional loan, we are trading dozens of work hours for the promise of future payment.

Read the rest of this article on the Freelance Union’s blog.

8 Contract Provisions Every Freelancer Should Know

Share

Freelancers Union LogoGet things off to a good start for you and your clients. Make sure expectations are clear on both sides and stick to your guns when you have to set limits. This article from The Freelancer’s Union puts it all in perspective:

8 Contract Provisions Every Freelancer Should Know

If you’ve been freelancing for any amount of time, you’ve probably heard how important it is to get your client agreements in writing. As a former freelance writer and now lawyer who works with freelancers, I won’t tell you otherwise. It’s not just that a good contract can protect you if a client relationship goes south – it’s that a good contract helps avoid misunderstandings before they start. The very act of putting a contract together forces you and your client to articulate and clarify your expectations up front.

That said, some parts of a contract can be more important than others. Or at least they seem to come up more often in disputes. So, here’s a list of contract provisions to be particularly vigilant about, along with some tips on how to navigate them.

Read the rest of this article.